Kill Switch (Video 2008)

62968
Share
Copy the link

Kill Switch: Directed by Jeff King. With Steven Seagal, Isaac Hayes, Holly Elissa, Michael Filipowich. A troubled detective travels to Memphis in order to track down a pair of serial killers.

“The name u0026#39;Steven Seagalu0026#39; may not put the fear of God into many people these days, but when it is preceded by the two little words u0026#39;written byu0026#39; it is something to strike fear in the hearts of stronger men than me. Summoning that peculiar kind of bravery possessed by a masochist equipped with a dozen clothes pegs and a wet shoelace I girded my loins and pressed the u0026#39;forwardu0026#39; button on my remote. There was no going back now, like one of Seagalu0026#39;s on screen sparring partners I was to be exposed to every sweaty punch and chop the big (big) man chose to throw in my direction.u003cbr/u003eu003cbr/u003eI can get back the precious 8% of available recording time KillSwitch occupied on my Sky box, and the 90 minutes I lost watching the film are, in the grand scheme of things, only a minimal fraction of my intended lifespan, but my faith in the movie-making business may never be the same after watching this unholy mess.u003cbr/u003eu003cbr/u003eThe story is rubbish – that was to be expected after we learned who the screenwriter was – but the direction and editing in this film are surely something to be amazed by. The direction varies from pedestrian to excruciatingly bad – we see one bad guy crashing through a window half-a-dozen times, another bad guy collapse onto a table three times, etc. The editor keeps cutting away from the fights to the same headshot of Seagal in which he looks like a mildly interested bystander. In one fight scene, his opponentu0026#39;s bloody scars keeping appearing and disappearing. Another fight seems to go on forever, with all participants seeming to possess super-heroic stamina levels, and you end up watching in stupefaction, not quite able to believe that a movie fight scene is actually boring you.u003cbr/u003eu003cbr/u003eSeagal plays a Southern cop with issues. It seems he witnessed the murder of his brother when he was a kid. What bearing this has on his present-day pursuit of a serial killer is never really explained. Neither is the identity or motive of the murderer. In fact the incident just seems to have been added to fill out the running time, give the director (whoever he is – I really canu0026#39;t be bothered to check) a chance to show off all the flashy tricks he learned while balancing on top of a dustbin to peer through the window of the local film studies classroom, and to give Seagal the opportunity to come over all broody every now and then.u003cbr/u003eu003cbr/u003eSeagal was never sylph-like but, judging by the way we are treated to a lot of head-and-shoulder shots but hardly any full-lengths shots of him, his girth has expanded considerably since the 90s. In fact, he doesnu0026#39;t even move when he fights: he just parries his opponentsu0026#39; blow and waits for them to stray close enough for him to fell them with his meaty paw.”

Comments

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *