Color of Night (1994)

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Color of Night: Directed by Richard Rush. With Bruce Willis, Jane March, Rubén Blades, Lesley Ann Warren. A color-blind psychiatrist Bill Capa is stalked by an unknown killer after taking over his murdered friend’s therapy group, all of whom have a connection to a mysterious young woman that Capa begins having intense sexual encounters with.

“As I sit and recall all the idiocies of this film, one of the most amusing that I remember is the idea put forth that a person with DID will disguise themselves to look like a different person when one of their alternates come out. In nearly eleven years of knowingly watching these patients switch from personality to personality, I have yet to see this happen. This is before we even get into the fact that Jane Marchu0026#39;s behaviour during this film more closely resembles that of a person suffering mania – hypersexuality, paranoia, irrational fear, and so forth.u003cbr/u003eu003cbr/u003eBruce Willis must also be wondering why he signed up for this stinker. Iu0026#39;m sure the shooting script must have looked wonderful, but a combination of extremely clumsy editing (the sex scenes in the middle of the film are a wonderful example) and poor character development turned this into another Plan 9 From Outer Space. To all of you who gave this turkey positive comments, I ask you to ask yourselves: what psychiatrist in their right mind would see patients in buildings where it is that easy for patients to off themselves? Especially in such a lawsuit-happy society as America? What psychiatrist in their right mind stays back late in their office without carrying a firearm when they know someone is stalking them? Finally, when was the last time you heard of a psychiatrist taking over a group of patients for a friend in the profession when one of them might have murdered him? Oh, and a special note on Ruben Bladesu0026#39; role: even beat police are not that ignorant about psychiatry, an especially important element of their job considering how often they may be confronted by psych patients waving weapons in the middle of an episodic crisis.u003cbr/u003eu003cbr/u003eAs a veteran of numerous therapy groups, I could not stop laughing at this film. If it had been approached with the intention of making a comedy, then it would have succeeded beyond all expectations. However, the advertising campaign and the babbling tone of the dialogue left me with the general feeling that this film was taking itself WAY too seriously. If you do take yourself that seriously, get a better script. If you have such a ridiculous script that will get laughed at by the 20% that will experience some form of psychiatric problem in their lifetime (thatu0026#39;s just a statistical fact based on reported cases… the real incidence may actually be higher), donu0026#39;t take yourself so seriously. Itu0026#39;s that simple.”

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