This Island Earth (1955)

This Island Earth (1955)

Released: 1955
Genre: Genre, Horror, Mystery, Sci-Fi
Director: Joseph M. Newman
Starring: Rex Reason, Faith Domergue, Jeff Morrow, ,
Run time: 86 min
IMDb: 5.9/10
Country: USA
Views: 77142

Synopsis

Storyline:
The electronic engineer Dr. Cal Meacham is a prominent scientist that is studying industrial application of nuclear energy and also a great pilot. One day, he receives a different condenser and soon his assistant Joe Wilson receives a manual instruction and several components of a sophisticated machine. Carl and Joe build a communication apparatus and a man called Exeter contacts Carl. He tells that Carl has passed the test assembling the Interocitor and invites him to join his research. The intrigued Carl decides to travel to meet Exeter that sends an unmanned airplane to bring him to an isolated facility in Georgia. He is welcomed by Dr. Ruth Adams but she mysteriously does not recall their love affair in the past. They team-up with Dr. Steve Carlson and they note that the other scientists in the facility have been transformed, having a weird behavior. They decide to flee in a car, but they are attacked by rays and Steve dies. Carl and Ruth also witness the facility blowing-up and …
Written by
Claudio Carvalho, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
User Reviews: I first saw this movie when it was released in 1954. I was about six. I didn’t see it again until @1967/1968, as a theatrical re-release. The big screen did help, but this second viewing, and subsequent viewings on video (I own it), show that it wasn’t as perfect as my youthful eyes saw it to be. However, I still consider it a great show. It has the same basic plot of world domination by aliens that other movies of its day had, but, it is so different in it’s approach, feel, and delivery, it just never seemed like the same plot to me.

It was also a rare Sci-Fi motion picture. It was filmed in color. Of the eleven horror/sci-fi movies of 1954 (and this list might not be exactly complete), only three were in color. Riders To The Stars (1954), Phantom Of The Rue Morgue (1954), and This Island Earth (four if you put 20,000 Leagues Under The Sea (1954) into this group). The remainder of the list range from the cheap quickie to the higher budgeted movie that had some effort put into them. The list is: Devil Girl From Mars (1954), Creature From Black Lagoon (1954), Killers From Space (1954), Godzilla (1954) [this is the Japanese release], Monster From The Ocean Floor (1954), Stranger From Venus (1954), Them! (1954), and Tobar The Great (1954). These black and white shows did have merit in their own way. And, they did what they were made for, to entertain a crowd of kids (and some adults). Almost everyone appreciates color more than black and white, and for a "Kid’s" Science Fiction movie to be in color, it made This Island Earth all the more special.

Of course, the special effects, acting, and other aspects of this movie don’t match up to today’s standards. If it did, it would mean that there had been no advancements in over 40 years. For its day, the special effects are extremely well done. The sets were impressive. The script was intellectual without going leaps and bounds about the child viewer’s head. The Mutant really wasn’t as good as I remembered, but it was still impressive. Bud Westmore was the master of his day. He, Jack Pierce, and other makeup masters of the past, created the foundation for today’s highly imaginative work.

Just think, future generations probably will give negative reviews of Stars Wars, Jurassic Park, E.T. and many of the other groundbreaking movies of our time. They will probably laugh at the "poor" quality of the special effects, or the stilted dialogue and acting just as some of the younger audience does today.

I agree with other writers that point out how much people miss by not watching a black and white, or even just not watching an older movie. They don’t come across as hip, realistic, terrifing, or as erotic as today’s fare, but, if you really look at these shows, you will find the cornerstone of today’s movies created by that moldy oldy from 40, 50, 60, or even 70 years ago.

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