St. Elmo’s Fire (1985)

St. Elmo’s Fire (1985)

Released: 1985
Genre: Drama, Genre, Romance
Director: Joel Schumacher
Starring: Andrew McCarthy, Rob Lowe, Demi Moore, ,
Run time: 110 min
IMDb: 6.4/10
Country: USA
Views: 135484

Synopsis

Storyline:
Seven friends – Alec, Billy, Jules, Kevin, Kirby, Leslie and Wendy – are trying to navigate through life and their friendships following college graduation. Alec, who aspires to political life, has just shown his true colors by changing his allegiance from Democrat to Republican, which freaks out girlfriend Leslie, who he wants to marry. Budding architect Leslie, on the other hand, has an independent streak. She believes she has to make a name for herself to find out who she is before she can truly commit to another person in marriage. But Leslie and Alec have decided to live together. Because Leslie refuses to marry Alec, he believes that justifies certain behavior. Kirby, who wants to become a lawyer and who pays for his schooling by working as a waiter at their local hangout called St. Elmo’s Bar, and struggling writer Kevin are currently roommates. They are on opposite extremes of the romance spectrum. Kirby has just reconnected with Dale Biberman, a slightly older woman he knew …
Written by
Huggo
User Reviews: A few comments here have slammed this movie for being shallow, despite decent performers. Maybe this is not 100% similar to real life. But it does have some parallels, and except for the Judd Neldon character (rather annoying) it is realistic and comedic in some aspects.

Demi Moore as Jules is simply lost in denial borrowing money to keep up an image of success. They are 26 years old and have no clue what is in store. Andrew McCarthy likable and sympathetic. Ally Sheedy, just okay. Rob Lowe is very good as irresponsible Billy, involved with Mare Winningham, the resident unattractive ‘old standby’ girlfriend.

There are some scenes reminiscent of a frat party. A few scenes with Emilio Estevez, pursuing a pipe-dream romance with Andie McDowell. Basically it addresses recent graduates floundering, attempting different careers and lifestyles, affairs and obsessions. It catches that time period most of us had, when we thought we were so significant in the world, not yet jaded, still trying to find meaning and hope. The Winningham character particularly conveys the aspect of the screenplay. When her father (Martin Balsam) tells her to just get married settle down and have a greeting card franchise (like the rest of her family) No I am committed to my real job, she says as she works as a social worker, still trying to have an affect.

Similar to the later Generation X issues, and the now sense of alienation, everyone goes through similar growing pains, whether 80’s materialism, 90’s nihilism (‘Reality Bites’) or today’s general alienation and violence. The issues are the same, the culture just manifests them a bit differently. 8/10

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