Sidewalks of New York (2001)

Sidewalks of New York (2001)

Released: 2001
Genre: Comedy, Genre, Romance
Director: Edward Burns
Starring: Penny Balfour, Heather Graham, Edward Burns, ,
Run time: 108 min
IMDb: 6.4/10
Country: USA
Views: 126818

Synopsis

Storyline:
Six New Yorkers have an interrelated series of relationships. TV producer Tommy, who’s just broken up with his girlfriend, has a short relationship with commitment-phobe Maria, who he meets in a video store, and also hooks up with married real-estate agent Annie, who he meets while apartment hunting. Annie is open to a relationship because her husband, Griffin, is cheating on her, which she slowly comes to realize through talking to her friend/co-worker who’s gone through the same thing. Griffin, a 39-year-old dentist, is cheating with 19-year-old waitress Ashley, who he picked up in a park; she realizes she can do better when Ben, a hotel doorman and aspiring musician, tries to pick her up, in a belated attempt to recover from his divorce a year ago from schoolteacher Maria (the same Maria from the video store). Most of these relationships seem driven more by a desperate need to be in a relationship than actual love.
Written by
Jon Reeves <[email protected]>
User Reviews: Like many other commentators here, I got that Woody Allen feeling while watching this movie. "Sidewalks of New York" had some likeable and some dislikeable elements. It did provide plenty of interesting commentary on the rather sad state of modern relationships, but at the same time, this relationship banter included a preponderance of sex talk, to the point where I wanted to yell at half the characters, "All right, we get it! Stop whining already." The acting was fairly good, even from Heather Graham, surprisingly enough. Brittany Murphy, as well. The "documentary" feel, despite jittery camera shots, gave the film a refreshingly different atmosphere, that saved it from descending even farther into the depths of melodrama. My final complaint is one that I have about a lot of movies, so it isn’t entirely specific to this one: Why New York? Why is it always New York? Of course, I understand the budget concern here, but the story would have worked in any city of appreciable size. Let me say, I would lay down my money at a theater if I knew a movie was set in a place such as Denver, St. Louis, Kansas City, Dallas, Atlanta, Chicago, Detroit, Seattle, or practically any city outside of L.A/S.F or the Boston-DC region. (For movies set in NYC, though, I liked "The Bone Collector" because it showed the seedy, older sides of the city, not just the glitzy Manhattan Skyline)

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