Never Say Goodbye (1956)

Never Say Goodbye (1956)

Released: 1956
Genre: Drama, Genre, Romance
Director:
Starring: George Sanders, Cornell Borchers, Rock Hudson, ,
Run time: 96 min
IMDb: 6.3/10
Country: USA
Views: 178912

Synopsis

Storyline:
Dr. Michael Parker (Rock Hudson) is a prominent surgeon, who unexpectedly runs into his German-born wife Lisa (Cornell Borchers), who he thought was dead. Victor (George Sanders), an artist (and his “dead” wife’s now boyfriend), berate Dr. Parker for killing her. This story is told in flashback to Austria during World War II as we learn how Dr. Parker met and married his wife, and the one mistake which may have cost him his family.
Written by
hiphats
User Reviews: This is a beautiful color film which many might classify as a ‘"woman’s picture". However, it has three very fine performances by Rock Hudson, George Sanders and Cornell Borchers, very good supporting actors and a moving storyline told from the point of view of the male participant. So it is a romance, a dramatic film, and a frankly superior "tear-jerker" all rolled into one. The storyline is fairly straightforward. Michael Parker, a doctor, married a German girl and lost her during WWII, having to go on while thinking she is dead. She reenters his life in the US with an old friend as escort, one who blames him for what she had to suffer. She wants to get back together with Parker, but first has to win over his daughter who idolizes the mother she has never known; finally, the escort, an artist, draws the little girl a picture of her mother, and seeing it, the little girl learns who is her real mother accepts her joyfully. The film was written from a Luigi Pirandello play, and the final version of the screenplay was done by Charles Hoffman. The cast is an unusually good one. Directed by Jerry Hopper, it also features Ray Collins, David Janssen, Casey Adams, Jerry Paris, John Banner, Robert F. Simon, Helen Wallace, Frank Wilcox and many others. The remarkable fact of the production is the realism of its motivations and reactions; it is never glossy, never cheap, often very moving. Shelley Fabares as the stubborn little girl is quite good also. But lovely Cornell Borchers and suave George Sanders are the best actors in this solid film. The technical production is very good, for any era. Sets by Russell A Gausman and Julia Heron, music by Frank Skinner, Bill Thomas’s costumes and hairstyles by Joan St. Oegger plus makeup by Bud Westmore insured that this was to be an expensive-looking ad beautiful finished product. This is an appealing story, which qualifies as a wartime film also, one partly told in interesting flashbacks; it has never been appreciated for what it avoided becoming nor for what it was made to be–a very fine story about people whose lives were torn asunder by war…

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