Imagine: John Lennon (1988)

Imagine: John Lennon (1988)

Released: 1988
Genre: Animation, Documentary, Genre, Music
Director: Andrew Solt
Starring: Paul McCartney, Yoko Ono, John Lennon, ,
Run time: 100 min
IMDb: 7.9/10
Country: USA
Views: 117353

Synopsis

Storyline:
This “biography” evolves around the nearly 240 hours of film and videotape fortuitously taken by Lennon of his life. The archive footage is transformed into a fascinating life story of one of the most complex and fascinating men of the modern music era. This effort includes a 36 song soundtrack. Includes some very personal and insightful footage, never before made available to the public.
Written by
Todd Tidyman
User Reviews: Forget the unmistakable legend of the Beatles for about two hours! This one is entirely about John! I give kudos to the producers who show how this complex and fascinating artist was also a brilliant man and a wonderful human being with strengths as well as frailties! Just listening to and watching the people from John’s life (his two wives and sons especially) as they talk about him clearly shows how much they not only loved him, but that they miss him terribly. I went out and rented this film for the first time in years last December around the 20th anniversary of John’s cruel and senseless murder! I loved seeing him triumph over the crooked Nixon White House in the latter’s attempt to deport him. I also had to smile when the so-called "lost weekend" was over and he was back with Yoko, which only got better with Sean’s birth! I found myself touched by the scene where he tells the vagrant the truth behind his songwriting, and then invites him in for a meal. I never met John personally, but after seeing this film I felt like I knew him. By the time the film got to the footage of the Lennons walking in Central Park shortly before his death, I cringed when I heard John’s recorded voice saying "…until I’m dead and buried; and I hope that’s a long, long time". The slowed-down footage against the background music of the crescendo coda of "A Day In The Life" leading up to the tragic event was well-edited and made its desired impact (the glasses falling and shattering on the cement). Then the newsreel footage of the mourners from around the world. As a fan of John’s, I didn’t have to look at that footage for very long before losing my composure and feeling the profound sense of loss I felt years ago when it happened. In short, I cried long and hard. I won’t give the son of a bitch who shot him the satisfaction of mentioning his name. He is the lowest form of life on earth, and this film does John justice by not giving any mention of his name either. Those who love John will love this film. It doesn’t portray him as a big shot rock star! It portrays him as I think he wanted to be seen: as a vulnerable human being, just like us!

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