Holding the Man (2015)

Holding the Man (2015)

Released: 2015
Genre: Biography, Drama, Genre, Romance
Director: Neil Armfield
Starring: Francesco Ferdinandi, Sarah Snook, Ryan Corr, ,
Run time: 127 min
IMDb: 7.3/10
Country: Australia
Views: 181154

Synopsis

Storyline:
Tim and John fell in love while teenagers at their all-boys high school. John was captain of the football team, Tim an aspiring actor playing a minor part in Romeo and Juliet. Their romance endured for 15 years to laugh in the face of everything life threw at it – the separations, the discrimination, the temptations, the jealousies and the losses – until the only problem that love can’t solve tried to destroy them.
User Reviews: I really really liked this movie! It was a relentless and at times confronting experience, but proof positive that storytelling when it is steeped in such truth and such life experience, in the hands of brilliant storytellers results in exemplary cinema. Neil Armfield has long been a leading light in Australian theatre, and I had nearly forgotten his feature ‘Candy’ with Heath Ledger and Abbie Cornish, but was reminded of it, as I sat spellbound by the performances in ‘Holding The Man’ and its expert direction and attention to detail. Being in the audience for this movie, I felt safe in the hands of a master director. Ryan Corr, best known for the small screen like ‘Packed to the Rafters’ is a revelation; throwing himself head first into this leading role and intrepidly going where I suspect few actors might go. Craig Stott was a discovery for me, and although I struggled with some of the early scenes and wardrobe choices, his performance was realised as a truly moving and career making turn. Lots of great actors in supporting roles and cameos including the hilarious Kerry Walker in a blink and you’ll miss it part. There’s lots of humour, lots of pathos and lots of sexual activity which is thoughtfully and bravely brought to the screen. This is a must see experience, a story that needed to be told and has honoured the actor/writer Timothy Conigrave in so doing. Aussie filmmaking at its very finest.

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