After the Dark (2013)

After the Dark (2013)

Released: 2013
Genre: Drama, Fantasy, Genre, Sci-Fi
Director: John Huddles
Starring: Daryl Sabara, Sophie Lowe, James D'Arcy, ,
Run time: 107 min
IMDb: 5.7/10
Country: USA
Views: 144841

Synopsis

Storyline:
When the last day of school comes for a group of students in a philosophy class, their instructor, Mr. Zimit, challenges them to different sorts of exercises that take place in a post-nuclear apocalyptic world. While there, they each get chosen professions and have to decide whether who is valuable or not because the bunker they will be staying in for a year has only enough oxygen for 10 people. Mr. Zimit challenges them in different rounds to see how they could survive. Issues arise when they notice Mr. Zimit is disruptive to the game.
Written by
James Hake
User Reviews: A bunch of kids who all seem to have arrived from the same toothpaste or shampoo commercial turn up for their last day at school ever. The teacher decides to run a philosophy role-play as a kind of review session. What follows are momentous life-and-death decisions with huge consequences for the fate of the human race.

Or not, as it turns out – because it is a classroom exercise. All the exotic settings, CGI explosions, and crisp cinematography cannot distract us from the fact that all that is at stake here is an A, B or C grade. There isn’t even a mention that someone might FAIL the class – the stakes are that low! The teacher threatens the lead girl with losing her A+ in a manner that, if taken seriously, would see him fired for power harassment and incompetence. Are we meant to fear for her in this ludicrous moment? Unfortunately, that is as dramatic as this film gets.

The so-called philosophy is preachy and immature. The pupils all kind of blend into each other as characterisation is one-note. And absolutely nothing of value is tested or put at risk here. It’s like The Breakfast Club was never made.

How this screenplay made it to the top of anyone’s pile is a crime that should be investigated. Two stars – one for the cinematography, the other for the huge drinking game potential.

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